September Favorites: This Monstrous Thing, The Weight of Feathers, and Everything, Everything

Yay! It’s time to recommend fall books! Here are a few of my favorite September releases in YA:

22811807Mackenzi Lee’s This Monstrous Thing is an alternative historical fantasy set in 1818, Geneva, that brilliantly reimagines Frankenstein with a steampunk twist. Alasdair Finch is a Shadow Boy, an illegal mechanic who supplies humans with clockwork parts. Two years ago, he secretly brought his brother back from the dead, but Oliver is more monster than man.

To make matters worse, Frankenstein has just been published anonymously and many people believe it is about a real-life doctor and his monster. As prejudice towards the Shadow Boys and clockwork people grows, Alasdair suspects that Frankenstein is about himself. Who exposed his secret? Oliver, Dr. Geisler, or the girl who helped revive Oliver but broke Alasdair’s heart…Mary Shelley?

20734002I can see why Anna-Marie McLemore’s The Weight of Feathers is being called “Night Circus meets Romeo and Juliet,” but don’t let such comparisons fool you into thinking it’s a copycat. This star-crossed romance between the daughter and son of two rival families of traveling performers (white-scaled “mermaids” vs. black-feathered tree-walkers) is inventive, magical, poetic, and multicultural (interweaving Spanish and French phrases).

When Lace Paloma and Cluck Corbeau meet, they don’t know they are enemies (since her white scales and his black feathers are hidden). She saves him from being beaten by her cousins; he rescues her from a chemical disaster. After Lace realizes she’s been touched by a Corbeau, whose “black magic” cursed her (accidentally binding her to him), her family casts her out. Hoping for a cure to the curse, she works for the Corbeaus (who don’t know her true identity). As she and Cluck become friends, then lovers, they uncover family secrets that challenge everything they’ve been led to believe. Will their love withstand all that’s against them? I highly recommend The Weight of Feathers for fans of The Accident SeasonBone Gap, The Walls Around Us, and The Sacred Lies of Minnow Bly.

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I effortlessly fell in love with Nicola Yoon’s Everything, Everything for many of the same reasons that I adore All the Bright Places, Simon vs. the Homo Sapiens Agenda, Because You’ll Never Meet Me, and Eleanor & Park.

Told through diary entries, instant messages, emails, vignettes, charts, illustrations, and more, Yoon’s debut is an imaginative, heartwarming love story about a girl and a boy whose relationship is doomed from the beginning, but that doesn’t stop them from being romantic, funny, hopeful, and adventurous. Maddie, a biracial seventeen-year-old, is allergic to the outside world and never leaves her house. The only people she’s allowed to see are her mom and her nurse. But then, Olly moves in next door…and they might just risk everything to be together.

Alyssa recommends new and upcoming releases in mostly young adult fiction at Coven Book Club and its sister site Spellbinding Books. She thanks Edelweiss, the publishers, and the Boulder Book Store for providing her with digital review copies of these books for review purposes only, and her opinions are her own. Please chat with her on Twitter about books! What are you looking forward to reading this fall? What are your favorite September releases?

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3 thoughts on “September Favorites: This Monstrous Thing, The Weight of Feathers, and Everything, Everything

  1. Pingback: What to Read Around Halloween: Part 1 | Coven Book Club

  2. Pingback: YA Recommendations Roundup: Summer/Fall 2015 | Coven Book Club

  3. Pingback: Fall 2016 YA Preview: October Books | Coven Book Club

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