Down a Darker Path: The Comics of Emily Carroll

91bldT8CbtL81gs3Mk0AALIt’s almost Halloween and I think we’re all looking for something a little scary to read. How about something downright terrifying? If you’re looking for something that will get under your skin and give you chills, something to only read in the daytime, then I suggest the work of Emily Carroll.

Carroll’s work has largely been in the realm of webcomics, which is fantastic for you (and me too!) because right after you read this, you can skip over to her website and get going. Carroll’s illustrations have an almost delicate quality; it’s similar to the work of Edward Gorey. They’re gorgeous and almost all of her comics have a fairytale-like quality to them.

I can almost guarantee that if you like Angela Carter or any of the other dark fairytale adaptations that I’ve recommended here in the past few months, that you’ll like Carroll’s work. In addition to her collection of webcomics, Carroll has a “real” book out, though you could always do what I did and buy the digital version, which seemed fitting after reading the webcomics.

Through the Woods is mostly new tales, conjured up from Carroll’s brain for the printed page. The exception is “His Face All Red”, which I strongly suggest you read in its webcomic version first to catch the original movement of the frames, which is much creepier than in the book. The other tales are new, though the prequel to “The Nesting Place” is one of Carroll’s webcomics, “All Along the Wall.”

Because the comics are so short, I almost don’t want to tell you what they’re “about.” Because short form horror depends so much on novelty, it seems wrong to give too much away. I’ve included some of the pages from Through the Woods at the bottom of this post so you can see Carroll’s beautiful work — I’m hoping it’ll draw you in and that you’ll click over to her website and enjoy a taste of her storytelling, before checking Through the Woods out from your library or buying it.

My recommendation would be to start with the webcomics. Many are interactive (like “Margot’s Room,” where clicking on objects will reveal a larger story. Others are somewhat less interactive for the reader, but Carroll’s use of scrolling up and down and left and right all add to an immersive experience that is difficult to come by in a book.

Through the Woods is worth it though. Carroll clearly knows how good horror should be constructed in a highly visual medium like comics and her page turns are well timed and the stories are well paced. However, while all of this is well and good, and obviously attractive to me as someone who likes scary fairy tales, this is only the tip of what make these stories so interesting.

Overall, what I like best is Carroll’s use of the unknown, the pauses, the gaps, and loose ends. Many of her stories don’t tie up nicely. It’s rare for Carroll’s stories to have a pat ending where the reader gets to know “what happened.” Many have classic horror endings, where one storyline is tied up nicely, but it’s obvious that another horror is lurking around the bend, and those are satisfying. However, my favorites are when Carroll gives us the puzzle pieces, but it’s clear that some are missing. Whatever our imaginations conjure up is most definitely more terrifying than any “answer” Carroll could give us.

This is the genius behind these short pieces, they engage our imaginations so deeply that we’re left thinking about the missing pieces of the plot, or the open endings for days. I also like that Carroll delves into scary territory that isn’t totally reliant on gore. I mean sure, there’s some gros s stuff, “Out of Skin” for instance, is a little more gory that I typically prefer, but Carroll’s ethereal illustrations render it palatable. The “scare” in most of these tales is visceral, but also psychological, and the double-down is really effective.

I’m always in for suspenseful stories, but I’m kind of a lightweight when it comes to horror, so coming from me, this is a big deal! Again, this reminds me most of Angela Carter’s work in The Bloody Chamber. It’s horrific, but it’s also beautiful. The balance is what makes it work for me, I think. This idea that horror and beauty so often go hand in hand is something I think women understand especially well. So please, go check out Emily Carroll’s beautiful webcomics and should you be further motivated, Through the Woods is available now.

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From “Our Neighbor’s House” in Through the Woods

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From “A Lady’s Hands Are Cold” in Through the Woods

Allison Carr Waechter is ready for the thinning of the veil. See you all on Halloween, you beautiful wraiths!

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