Short and Serial: Summer Comics

I am at the start of yet another summer of back to back summer school sessions. I teach writing online and in the summer, students are allowed to take a 15 week course in just 5 weeks. It’s crazy and I’m teaching two sessions that nearly overlap…

No, I’m not looking for sympathy, I’m letting you know that in times of extreme busy-ness, my reading list usually pares down to things like magazine and literary journals, rather than novels. However, in the last year I’ve gotten so much more into comics and they’re the perfect summer school balm to soothe my need for good storytelling, while providing a more substantial story arc.

I talked last week about Monstress, which I still absolutely recommend, but this week I’d like to tell you a little about the other comics I’ve been enjoying recently. While Monstress is written and illustrated by women, some of the following have male/female collaborations. To be honest, I’m not sure how that affects things in a larger sense. I’m not a wide comics reader, so I can’t speak to the issue on a larger level, but I have noticed that both Monstress and Pretty Deadly, which have women at the helm of the creative team both have a distinctly different vibe from other comics I’ve read. I can’t quite put my finger on it, but the narration, art and story arcs overall have a slightly different vibe from comics I’ve read where men and women have collaborated.

Even in the case of Pretty Deadly vs. Bitch Planet, both written by Kelly Sue DeConnick, the narrative style feels distinct, and not just because they are different types of comics. Something about Bitch Planet, despite its overtly feminist themes feels more masculine than Pretty Deadly, with its mystical story arc and strange narrative style.

I know this is a less-than-well-supported assessment. In fact, it’s pure opinion, based on nothing but my feelings, but I do see a subtle difference in the ways the stories are told. Not that any are worth more than others, but after almost three years of reading nearly all fictional work written by women, there is an almost intangible way that women tell stories that differs from the way men do. I’d love it if someone else could speak to this in a more intelligent way!

Onto the recommendations:

Pretty Deadly, by Kelly Sue DeConnick and Emma Rios

While Monstress is currently heading up my favorites list in the comics department, Pretty Deadly is a close, close second.

In Pretty Deadly:

Death’s daughter rides the wind on a horse made of smoke and her face bears the skull marks of her father. Her origin story is a tale of retribution as beautifully lush as it is unflinchingly savage.

Saga, by Brian K. Vaughn and Fiona Staples

I’ve loved Saga from the first issue. Fiona Staples brings amazing life to Brian Vaughn’s storytelling. Much like Monstress, Staples’ art is detailed in a way that is simply mind-blowing.

In Saga:

When two soldiers from opposite sides of a never-ending galactic war fall in love, they risk everything to bring a fragile new life into a dangerous old universe. Saga is the sweeping tale of one young family fighting to find their place in the worlds.

Bitch Planet, by Kelly Sue DeConnick and Valentine DeLandro

I’ve just gotten started on Bitch Planet. And if I’m honest, I’m a little on the fence about it. One of the things that I love most about Monstress, Pretty Deadly and Saga are the beautiful art and I’m simply not as attracted to DeLandro’s style as I am to Takeda, Staples or Rios’. But I’m enjoying seeing where the story goes and I’d recommend giving it a read.

In a future just a few years down the road in the wrong direction, a woman’s failure to comply with her patriarchal overlords will result in exile to the meanest penal planet in the galaxy. When the newest crop of fresh femmes arrive, can they work together to stay alive or will hidden agendas, crooked guards, and the deadliest sport on (or off!) Earth take them to their maker?

Allison Carr Waechter is waiting for the rain so she doesn’t have to go water the garden. 

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